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Seminar at Speech, Music and Hearing:

Biologically-Inspired design and control of musical robots to enable physically-embodied expressive musical performances to interact with musicians

Jorge Solis, Karlstad University, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering - Adjunct Researcher, Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Japan - Visiting Researcher, Humanoid Robotics Research, Waseda University, Japan

Abstract

The recent technological advances in robot technology, musical information retrieval, artificial intelligence, etc. may enable anthropomorphic robots to roughly emulate the physical dynamics and motor dexterity of human while playing musical instruments. In particular, the research on musical robots opens the opportunity to study several aspects of humans, such as understanding human motor control from an engineering point of view, understanding how humans create expressive music performances, finding new ways of interactive musical expression, etc. The research on music robots focuses in producing a live performance by mechanical means, from which new research paradigms can be conceived. However, there are still several technical issues to be solved for enabling musical robots to analyze and synthesize musical sounds as musicians do, to understand and reason about music, and to adapt behaviors accordingly. In this talk, the current research advances on the biologically-inspired design and control of musical robots to enable physically-embodied expressive musical performance to interact with human partners (i.e. musicians) will be presented. In particular, the recent research results on the development of an anthropomorphic flutist and saxophonist robot will be detailed.

For more information, see Web link

10:30 - 11:30
Friday December 7, 2012

The seminar is held in KTH Teknikringen 14, Room 304 , 3rd floor.

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Last updated: Wednesday, 23-Jun-2010 09:22:46 MEST